chocorandom
My wife in a cage with a monkey.
chocorandom
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asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
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kenkamishiro:

【腐】ぐーるろぐ by ゆう
Permission to repost given by artist.
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asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
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eleonora-goescrazy:

Corona Capital Festival 2014.
by: E. Rivera
eleonora-goescrazy:

Corona Capital Festival 2014.
by: E. Rivera
eleonora-goescrazy:

Corona Capital Festival 2014.
by: E. Rivera
eleonora-goescrazy:

Corona Capital Festival 2014.
by: E. Rivera
eleonora-goescrazy:

Corona Capital Festival 2014.
by: E. Rivera
eleonora-goescrazy:

Corona Capital Festival 2014.
by: E. Rivera
eleonora-goescrazy:

Corona Capital Festival 2014.
by: E. Rivera
eleonora-goescrazy:

Corona Capital Festival 2014.
by: E. Rivera
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breathtakingdestinations:

Mölln - Germany (von Witz und Verstand)
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azurea:

Eyes wide shut (by spannerino)
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